Humility

Natalie

Cabin: Trail’s End

As I began to write this speech on humility, I decided to start from the beginning.  I looked up the definition of humility: “The state or quality of being humble, the absence of pride or self assertion.”  So then I started thinking, how many different forms and uses of the word there are.  There is humble, humbler, humblest, humbled, humbling, humbleness and humbly.  I asked myself, if there are that many grammatical forms of the word, exactly how many times and ways do we put those forms into action?  In order to answer that question, I had to decide what I think true expressions of humility are.  In Miscellaneous Writings, Mary Baker Eddy wrote, “humility is no busy body: it has no moments for trafficking in other people’s business, no place for envy, no time for idle words, vain amusements, and all the et cetera of the ways and means of personal sense” (p. 356). When one is truly humble they don’t know jealously or anger, they don’t waste time with things that aren’t empowering, helpful, or worthy of our time.  Humility is a spiritual quality expressed by honesty and love.  Perhaps humility is as simple as taking the time to listen to a friend, admitting when we are wrong and apologizing, or not taking the easy way out. So how, exactly, does this apply to us?  How can we use all this knowledge in our every day lives?  Well, here is a personal story I would like to share.

A few years ago, I moved to a new school.  It was very difficult for me to leave my familiar home and friends and move across the country.  As the year progressed, I was still having trouble making friends and becoming happy and settled in my new high school.  I couldn’t shake the feelings of not belonging, of not being worthy enough to talk to, and I even began to think that I was different and couldn’t possible “fit in”.  Unfortunately, it took me awhile to realize that none of this was true. We all know the commandment “Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.” I realized that in order to do this, we must first love ourselves.  What a humbling moment.  I realized right then and there that “love is reflected in love”.  I needed to take myself out of the equation.  I needed to be meek and loving towards others and stop punishing them for their so-called “neglect”.  On my journey to finding the “real me”, I grew to appreciate myself and others, make meaningful friendships, and enjoy my time at school.  By expressing graciousness, understanding, humility, joy and love, I grew happier as an individual.  I was also able to recognize and cherish all the good in my life.

Humility is also expressed when we quiet our thought and listen to God’s direction.  Sometimes our plan isn’t the same as God’s plan.  I wasn’t initially planning on being a CT this summer, but my friend helped me realize that my right place this summer was at camp.  So I took my human will out of the equation and let God lead me.  This was the best decision I could have made because God’s plan is always far superior to our own.  I am so very grateful to be at camp this summer, and also for all the knowledge that I have gained.  So, it is always beneficial to humbly take a step back, focus on how you can help others, and listen for God’s direction.  By being humble and loving, you will ultimately receive so much love and goodness in return!